Georgia and Western Europe at the Beginning of the 14th Century (The Later Crusades)

Manana Javakhishvili

Abstract


In the Middle Ages, Christian Georgia and Western Europe were united in the fight against the Muslim East. On the one hand, Georgia, pressed by Muslims, sought assistance in Western European countries, whereas Christian Europe also considered Georgia an ally against the Islamic East.

The object of my interest is the letter written by George V the Brilliant (1314-1346) to the King of France - Philip VI Valois (1328-1350) in which George the Brilliant agrees to participate in the Crusade campaign. The fact discussed in the letter is the initiative of Phillip de Valois regarding organising the Crusade with the participation of European kings and aristocracy against Muslims and, specifically, against the Egyptian sultan Mohammed An-Nasir (1229-1340).

Having studied this important document (a letter by George V) I decided to research the historical context of the period, specifically, to explore the significance of the Crusade campaign initiated by Philippe de Valois. What was it caused by, when was it planned, why, by whom, and who took part in this venture and how was it being prepared, and more importantly, to explain a very interesting, although a lesser known issue to Georgian historiography: Why did the King of France decide to involve Georgia in this venture and why did Western European countries become interested in Georgia specifically during the period of late Crusades. And, finally, what was the Georgian interest in this campaign.

In order to find answers to these questions and having studied the European sources and scholarly literature regarding the issue, I have tried to explain the reasons for the participation of the parties and their reasons for their expectations.


Keywords


Later Crusades; Georgian-European relationships; George V the Brilliant; Philippe VI de Valois

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